“You cannot solve a problem from the same consciousness that created it. You must learn to see the world anew.” Albert Einstein

Council on Foreign Relations

Zibigniew Brzezinski on Global Awakening.

CFR Website:http://www.cfr.org/

As stated on its website, the CFR’s mission is to be “a resource for its members, government officials, business executives, journalists, educators and students, civic and religious leaders, and other interested citizens in order to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries.”

The CFR aims to maintain a diverse membership, including special programs to promote interest and develop expertise in the next generation of foreign policy leaders. It convenes meetings at which government officials, global leaders and prominent members of the foreign policy community discuss major international issues. Its think tank, the David Rockefeller Studies Program, is composed of about fifty adjunct and full-time scholars, as well as ten in-resident recipients of year-long fellowships, who cover the major regions and significant issues shaping today’s international agenda. These scholars contribute to the foreign policy debate by making recommendations to the presidential administration, testifying before Congress, serving as a resource to the diplomatic community, interacting with the media, authoring books, reports, articles, and op-eds on foreign policy issues.

The council publishes Foreign Affairs, “the preeminent journal of international affairs and U.S. foreign policy.” It also publishes Independent Task Forces which bring together experts with diverse backgrounds and expertise to work together to produce reports offering both findings and policy prescriptions on important foreign policy topics. To date, the CFR has sponsored more than fifty reports.

The CFR aims to provide up-to-date information and analysis about world events and U.S. foreign policy. In 2008, CFR.org’s “Crisis Guide: Darfur” was awarded an Emmy Award by the Television Academy of Arts and Sciences, in the category of “New Approaches to News & Documentary Programming: Current News Coverage.” In 2009, the Crisis Guide franchise won another Emmy for its “Crisis Guide: The Global Economy,” in the category of business and financial reporting.