“You cannot solve a problem from the same consciousness that created it. You must learn to see the world anew.” Albert Einstein

Even BPA-Free Plastics Leach Harmful Chemicals


By Anthony Gucciardi – Activist Post

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a known endocrine-disrupting hormone mimicker, present in a large majority of plastic products and even canned goods. But what about plastics that don’t contain BPA? A new study has found that even products that claim to be BPA-free oftentimes still leach endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In fact, the study found that 70% of common plastic products were tested positive for estrogenic activity, and the number skyrocketed to 95% when the products were put through real world conditions such as microwaving or dishwashing.
The study shows that even products labeled “BPA-free” still pose a threat to human health, and many contain phthalates, also known as “plasticizers.”
Phthalates are a group of industrial chemicals used in the production of plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Used to make the plastics more flexible and resilient, phthalates are also found in many cosmetic products and plastic containers. Two studies published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives in 2003 found that pregnant women exposed to phthalates were at an increased risk of pregnancy complications, as the chemicals negatively affect the development of the fetus in unknown ways.
Phthalates have even been found to reduce masculinity in men, according to a study published in the International Journal of Andrology. The researchers found that elevated levels of  in pregnant women’s urine are linked to more feminine play behavior in young males.
Phthalates are found in, among other things:

  • Processed food packaging
  • Hoses
  • Raincoats
  • Shower curtains
  • Vinyl flooring and wall coverings
  • Lubricant and adhesives
  • Detergents
  • Beauty products like nail polish, hair spray, shampoo, deodorants, and fragrances
  • Toys

Please contact plastic product makers to let them know that you are aware of the dangers of industrial chemicals and prompt them about their plans to reduce or eliminate the dangers.

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